Posts Tagged With: ham radio

FT WAYNE HAMFEST ADVENTURE

The weekend of November 16-17 was the annual Ft. Wayne Hamfest and Computer Expo.  It’s also the annual ARRL Indiana Section Convention.  For my friends and I it signifies the end of the yearly hamfest circuit until the “Big One” in Dayton.  I try to attend when I can.  It’s held at the Allen Co. War Memorial Coliseum and is all indoors.  A real bonus this time of year in Indiana.  My travelling buddy, Nick N9SJA accompanied me to the event.  We didn’t go to any of the convocation lectures that were held, but did enjoy looking at all the wares on display.  There was quite a variety of new and used radio gear and accessories for sale.  I somehow managed to spend a couple hundred dollars on random goodies.  Nick had more self control than me and only came away with a neat book on cold war missiles.

In addition to the commercial vendors and swap meet sale tables, there were several displays.  I enjoyed the FlexRadio display since I’m a proud owner.  That new 6000 series SDR is really something.  One display that really caught my eye was an APRS demo.  I think their main emphasis was targeting the EMCOMM community but it’s applications are far reaching.  As we were watching the display we saw the Purdue University AMET high altitude balloon beacon come across.  The students are doing upper atmosphere and near space research.  The W9YB Purdue Amateur Radio Club was partnering with them to provide tracking and comms.  As members of the Purdue ARC, Nick and I were quite interested.  The members had texted us earlier to let us know when it launched.  It was really neat to actually see the W9YB balloon beacon on the screen as it floated through the area.

The Purdue chase team already had two van loads of students on the way to track the balloon to the landing point.  Since The Nickster has a Yaesu FTM-350 mobile in the mighty F-150 we would be able to directly intercept the APRS packets.  We decided to join in the hunt.  Off came the shorty dual band antenna and on went the big 5/8 wave for better signal reception.  It also turned out to be of assistance in comms with the other chase team since they only had HT’s.  We were able to access good maps using our smartphones and aprs.fi.

After a hearty dinner we headed out on our adventure.  The last beacon was heard just south-west of Kalida, Ohio.  It was just under 3000 feet in altitude and travelling about 40 MPH.  We estimated where it might go down based on it’s direction of travel and approximate rate of descent.  You can’t believe our surprise when we saw the first directly-received packet come across the display on the Yaesu!  We were only a half mile away.  Soon after that we got a call on the radio and the AMET/PARC students had recovered it in a field.  They had thought ahead and covered the payload with blue LED’s in addition to multi-colored flagging to make it easier to visually locate.  An excellent idea as it was fully dark by this time.  They saw a glowing blue light in the field that led them right to it.

If you’ve read this far you might be interested in some further information.  Here’s a nice article and video from the local station WLFI TV18.  The AMET crew has loaded several videos from the on-board GoPro camera on their Youtube channel.  A lot of this was boring as there wasn’t much to see besides clouds.  I skipped a lot of them but really enjoyed the take-off and landing.  Warning!  the camera spins around a lot and can actually make you dizzy just sitting on the couch.  Still, pretty neat to actually see the curvature of the earth from so high up.  Finally, there are some nice pics on the TechPurdue flickr page.  They show some really great detail.  This was probably the most enjoyable ham radio activity in which I’ve participated in a long time.  Nick and I definitely want to do this again.  Now I guess I’m going to have to start building an APRS station for the “Zed Sled.”

Advertisements
Categories: Activities, Amateur Radio | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

LINEAR AMP HV POWER SUPPLY

I’m still sorting through the colossal stack of ham stuff I collected from Mark N9EKG.  One of the more interesting items is an Amp Supply LK-500NT.  Here’s a pic of the amp in my cluttered shack not long after I brought it home.
N9EKG gear4
This amplifier uses a pair of Eimec 3-500Z tubes to operate on 160-10M.  It differs from most traditional amps in that it’s designed to be no-tune.  There are no Plate Tune and Loading knobs.  All you have to do is select the correct band for operation and go.  There is a fine tuning knob that may be used for making minor tweaks but it’s not always needed.  Inside there are banks of air variable caps for each band that are factory adjusted as presets.  Another nice feature is that it’s capable of QSK keying for those high speed CW ops.  I’m guessing it must’ve been fairly expensive back in the early 1980’s when it came out.

The Amp Supply was pretty clean outside and in, but the high voltage power supply was a little weak.  The High Voltage meter was reading about 1000V low.  Some of the components definitely looked suspect.

LK old4LK old3

To remedy this, I purchased a rebuild kit from Harbach Electronics.  I have to say that I’m very impressed with the quality of this kit.  The circuit board and components are top notch.  I found the instructions pretty easy to follow.  I didn’t have any issues building or testing it.

LK old2

The size of the new components were much smaller when compared to the originals.  This made it a lot easier to fit it back into the chassis after landing all the wires in their appropriate locations.

LK new1LK new2

Now my High Voltage meter is reading 2800V while idling.  I’ve been testing it into the dummy load and seeing around 1000W.  The engineers must have been constantly changing the plans because I’ve found multiple different versions of the manual on the web.  I’m currently checking to verify what the max currents should be for the Plate and Grid Meters.  Don’t what to tear it up.  I’m making some final tweaks and it’ll be ready to button up and put into service.  If a ham was really motivated, I think this amp could be modified to operate as a traditional amp.  With the stock tubes and HV power supply It should be capable of legal limit.  But for now it makes a great instant-on no tune amp providing a solid 10db boost when conditions require it.

Categories: Amateur Radio, Projects | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

POWER UP

One of the radios I received from Mark Quebe N9EKG was an old Hallicrafters S-40B.  I was hanging out with my buddy Nick N9SJA and we decided we should fire it up.  Seemed like a good idea since he was there with me when I got the radio.  I used my trusty method of bringing up the power slowly by inserting various wattage light bulbs in series with the hot lead in order to drop the voltage.  This is a crude method but it works.  I’m pleased to say that Nick and I both now have proper 20A variacs for this chore in the future.  I haven’t done anything with the radio but wipe it down with some Armor All and blow out the dust.  It isn’t perfect but it plays pretty well on the AM broadcast band.  The caps definitely need replaced and the pots need sprayed with some DeoxIT but you have to love it when a radio from the early ’50s is still working with no catastrophic failures.  It’s fun to listen to some old AM on the boatanchor radio.

Categories: Activities, Amateur Radio | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

SOME NEW-OLD GEAR

I recently received an offer to remove a tower/antenna system and a collection of amateur radio gear from a ham in my old hometown of Indianapolis.  Actually, he’s the father of a high school classmate of mine and his wife is a former co-worker of my mom.  Mark N9EKG and his wife Susie got in touch with my mom to see if I was interested.  This was an offer too good to refuse for a cheapo like me.  Sometimes telling everyone you’re a ham can pay off.  I did a little Google Map recon and determined that it was a little more than I might want to tackle alone.  So, I enlisted the help of Nick N9SJA and also my trusty Old Man.  There was a narrow window of opportunity to pull all this off so we hit it hard and managed to knock it all out in one long day.

Originally, I’d hoped to save the tower but it was not in very good shape.  At least it was safe enough to climb on.  It did have a nice tribander on it and a Cushcraft R7 vertical.  The beam will need a little refurbishing but the vertical looks great.  I think it might be fun to try it out and see how it compares to my hexbeam.  It might be nice to have a multi-band omnidirectional antenna for listening and the switch to the beam if there’s a station I want to work.  We were actually able to dig a little around the base and pull the whole thing down while pulling the concrete base out.  My Old Man working the saws-all made short work of the tower and it can now be scrapped out.
N9EKG tower

After lunch we headed to the attic.  There were boxes full of treasures and some of the older radio gear.  This had been the original station while the kids were growing up.  He build a custom bench with many electrical outlets and a panel to fish the wires through.  He’d even had an air conditioner up there to keep it comfortable.  Unfortunately, that A/C was long gone.  We put some real sweat equity into retrieving that gear and hauling it down the spiral staircase.  Especially the Viking Valiant transmitter!

When the kids got older he was able to move his operation into a spare room on the main floor.  I bet that was a welcome treat!  He had a nice Kenwood TS-450 and TS-930 down there.  There was also an Amp Supply LK-500NT no tune amp.  This must’ve been a nice little station as he was able to work over 300 dxcc entities operating cw and phone.

It was a lot of work, but we still had fun.  I always enjoy visiting with another ham.  Thanks go out to Nick and my dad.  I also have to thank our hosts Mark N9EKG and Susie for their generosity and hospitality.  They provided some tasty sandwiches and chips and refreshing iced tea.  I hope to get as much enjoyment from the gear as Mark did.

I included a few shots of the gear all over the floor of my living room and then when I finally got it moved out to the shack.
N9EKG gear1N9EKG gear3
N9EKG gear5

Categories: Activities, Amateur Radio | Tags: , | 1 Comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.